The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

History (HIST)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

HIST 137: The Rise and Fall of Emperors: Julius Caesar, Charles V, and Napoleon

3.00 Credits

This course considers the reigns of Julius Caesar, Charles V, and Napoleon, all of whom rose to unprecedented levels of power during transformative epochs in European history: the transition from a republic to an empire in ancient Rome, the Protestant Reformation, and the French Revolution. All three subsequently lost control, and this course will consider their styles of leadership, their military strategies, and their political, social, and cultural contexts as they influenced their trajectories. This class is an introduction to historical analysis for freshmen and sophomores.

HIST 138: London: From Imperial Metropolis to Global City

3.00 Credits

This course charts the development of London from the Victorian age into the early twenty-first century, when a city known as the 'heart of the empire' became a truly global city. We'll explore the city through primary sources, including journalism, memoirs, fiction, legislation, and film, and through the work of social and cultural historians. Topics covered include: the transformation of the Victorian city through gas, light, and water; the role of the metropolitan press in shaping the significance of London within the Empire; the emergence of London as a playground for the rich and a home for the working poor; the city as battleground -- of total war between 1939 and 1945 -- and of governance in the 1970s and 1980s; and the remaking of the city as a sanctuary for the wealth of global elites.

HIST 139: Monarchy in European History

3.00 Credits

This course, which is open only to first years and sophomores, examines many facets of the institution of monarchy across European history, including theoretical justifications for it, its relationship with republics, commonwealths, and empires, and the dynastic family strategies employed in its creation and defense. Along the way we will consider the rituals of royalty, the roles of queens, the functions of aristocracy in monarchies, the problems of regents and cadet branches, episodes of regicide and revolution, child-rearing theories applied to heirs apparent, and the unstable lines between kings, despots, and tyrants. The course will begin with kings in ancient Greece and end with the perhaps surprising vitality of monarchy in modern Europe. Readings will include political theory, chronicles, diaries, folk tales, and letters, and we will also examine the images, iconography, and propaganda of kingship.

HIST 140: Travel and Tourism in Latin America

3.00 Credits

Many North Americans first experience Latin America through tourism and travel, whether during a boisterous spring break trip to Cancun, a forbidden visit to Havana, or an adventurous trek to the heights of Machu Picchu. This course will examine the long history of travel and tourism in Latin America, in order to understand the ways that the region has been shaped by encounters, interactions, and conflicts between travelers/"outsiders" and Latin Americans. Covering the period between the arrival of Columbus in 1492 and the present day, we will examine and analyze narrative accounts, maps, photographs, paintings, travel posters, and films in order to look at the ways that travelers experienced and described the racial, cultural, and political complexities of the region. We will also assess the costs and opportunities created by travel and tourism in the region, particularly in the latter half of the course, when we will discuss how modern Latin American governments created a tourist industry that continues to export an exotic and commercialized vision of the region for popular consumption.

HIST 201: Medieval Pathways

3.00 Credits

This interdisciplinary course explores the complexity of the medieval world (ca. 300-1500) as a way of introducing students to Medieval Studies. The course introduces multiple different modes of inquiry, or pathways, to the Middle Ages. Team-taught by several instructors, the course focuses on a different unifying theme each year. Students examine both material and written sources, and participate in multiple field trips to receive a hands-on introduction to Medieval Studies and to the many resources on campus and in Washington, D.C. The longer class session is used for occasional off-campus visits. Otherwise, the class will meet twice a week for 75 minutes each. The course serves as a gateway to the Medieval & Byzantine Studies major and minor (as MDST) and may fulfill the Arts & Sciences humanities requirement (as HIST or MDST) or literature requirement (as ENG).

HIST 205: History of Ancient Greece

3.00 Credits

A chronological survey of the political and social history of Greece from "Agamemnon to Alexander to Augustus." Covers the period from the late Bronze Age through the Hellenistic era, beginning with the Mycenaean kingdoms and concluding with the conquest of Cleopatra, the last ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt, by the future Roman emperor Augustus (31 BC). Focusing in particular upon the construction of Greek identity as shaped by such factors as geography, warfare, economy, and intercultural contact, the course will employ a textbook, primary sources read in English, and maps and other images to explore important issues in the evolution of Greek society. Subjects treated will include the rise of the Greek polis (city-state), the Greek colonization of the eastern and western Mediterranean, the development of diverse governmental and constitutional structures ranging from tyranny to democracy to monarchy, the blossoming of Greek artistic and intellectual life during the classical period and the conflicts between Greeks and Persians and between Athens and Sparta, the expedition of Alexander the Great, and the relationships of the Hellenistic kingdoms with Rome.

HIST 206: History of Ancient Rome

3.00 Credits

Surveys the history of Rome and its empire from the foundation of the city in the eighth century BC to its breakup into successor states in the fifth, sixth, and seventh centuries AD. Focuses on economic, social, and political themes, with special attention to geography, archaeology, and cultural exchange. Readings consist of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on critical interpretation.

HIST 206R: History of Rome

3.00 Credits

This course on the history of Rome is offered at CUA's Rome Program for students studying abroad.

HIST 216: Beyond the 'Fall' of Rome, 400-800

3.00 Credits

During the course of the fifth century in the West, the Roman empire fell. Or did it? This course will take up the classic theme of the Fall of Rome, and introduce students to new ways of understanding this pivotal period of transformation. First, the class will consider the Roman empire at its height; what did the Pax Romana mean? We will look at how the empire actually worked in the period immediately leading up to and following the reigns of Constantine (d. 337) and his successors. Second, we will examine the traditional narrative of "decline and fall" that supposedly followed upon early "barbarian" intrusion in the late fourth century and the Sack of Rome in 410. Third, turning our attention chiefly (although not exclusively) to the West, we will present an alternative and rather less simplistic account of "post-Roman" developments, focusing on patterns of government within the new settler kingdoms, changes in economy and culture, the impact of Christianization, and the endurance of Roman values, down to the rise of the Carolingians in 751. In short, the course will introduce students to a period of what was certainly radical change in European history, but will attempt to identify more accurately the causes, speed, and nature of that change.

HIST 216A: Medieval England

3.00 Credits

This lecture course will cover the history of Britain between the end of Roman rule in the early fifth century and the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485 that brought the Tudor dynasty to power. During this period, Britain experienced three major waves of colonization and conquest (Anglo-Saxon, Viking, and Norman) that profoundly transformed the lives of the peoples who inhabited the island. We will examine the rise of a unified English kingship; the often troubled relationship between England and its neighbors across the Channel on the one hand and the peoples of the "Celtic Fringe" on the other; the role of the Church in England, both at the level of high ecclesiastical politics (the conflict between St. Thomas Becket and King Henry II) and at the level of the ordinary lay Christian; and the changes in English economic, social, and cultural life that occurred against a backdrop of dramatic events such as the crusades, the Black Death, and the Hundred Years War.

HIST 221: Early Modern Europe

3.00 Credits

This course begins in the late Middle Ages and ends in the modern world. We will consider the political, cultural, economic, technological, and religious changes that transformed Europe from the relatively isolated Medieval Christendom into a region of fractious and advanced global powers. Topics covered will include the Renaissance and Reformation, global trade patterns, the military revolution and the wars of religion, the Thirty Years' War, the rise of the nation-state, republicanism and absolutism, the scientific revolution, the Enlightenment, and the multiple revolutions that close out our time period (English, American, French, and Haitian). The class will also provide an introduction to basic historical skills.

HIST 222: Modern European History, 1789-Present

3.00 Credits

This course provides an introduction into European History since the French Revolution. It focuses on the main events, and developments in politics, society and culture. The course consists of lectures, in-class discussions of required readings and primary sources.

HIST 223: The History of France: From the Gauls to De Gaulle

3.00 Credits

This course covers the political, social, cultural, and religious history of France, from the ancient Gallic tribes who fought Caesar to the long-haired and then do-nothing Merovingian kings; from Charlemagne through Louis XIV to Napoleon; from the wars of religion to perpetual revolution; from the mission to civilize French peasants to a 'civilizing' mission cast out over Europe and the entire globe.  A wide array of material culture will be used in class: music, art, coins, architecture, fashion, battle maps and fortifications, and, of course, food.

HIST 225A: History of Ireland to 1607

3.00 Credits

Ireland has been invaded repeatedly throughout its history. Each wave of new arrivals has caused a renegotiation of what it means to be "Irish." This course will engage directly with that question by surveying Irish society and culture from pre-Christian times down to the end of the old Gaelic order in 1607. We will glance at Irish prehistory and then examine "Celtic" society-- its social structure, laws and literature. Next, we will trace the impact of the Christianization of Ireland on this society. We will look at the effect on Ireland of invasions by the Vikings and the Normans, and the establishments of English rule in Ireland. We will then study the varying fortunes of the competing groups in Irish society (Gaelic Irish and Anglo-Irish), analyze the advent of the Reformation in Ireland, and examine the final conquest of Ireland in the reign of Elizabeth I and the passing of the old order.

HIST 226: British Empire, 1750-1970

3.00 Credits

What was the impact of the British Empire on the development of the modern world? Proceeding chronologically and thematically, this course explores that question through a survey of the expansion and contraction of Britain's imperial presence around the world. Through lecture and discussion of primary and secondary texts, we will explore the following: the shift from informal to formal empire; the economics of empire; slavery and its abolition; humanitarianism and the civilizing mission as justification for empire; and the use of violence in the conquest and maintenance of empire. Throughout the course, we will consider the advantages and limitations of using the British Empire as a model for understanding the history of globalization.

HIST 229: Global Migrations to the New World, 1492-present

3.00 Credits

Since 1492, almost every society, economy, and environment in the western hemisphere has been continuously affected by mass global migrations from Europe, Africa, and Asia. In this class, we will examine four periods of mass global migration to the Americas ' the era of exploration, discovery and conquest (1492-ca. 1600); the Atlantic slave trade (ca. 1500-1850s); the European and Asian migrations of the industrial age (ca. 1840-1930); and the contemporary period (ca. 1940-present). As we discuss each of these migrations, we will ask a series of questions: Who were these migrants? Where did they come from, and why did they leave? How did they change the preexisting society, economy, and environment in their area of settlement? Did they retain connections to their homelands, or to other groups of migrants? Most importantly, what can their lives tell us about the common history of the Americas?

HIST 231: World in the 20th Century

3.00 Credits

This class will examine political, economic, social, and cultural developments on a global scale from World War I to the 9/11 attacks. Topics will include the origins and aftermath of two world wars; the birth of mass movements, society, and consumerism; the crisis of democracy and the rise of communism and fascism as a response to economic depression; the emergence of the superpowers and resulting Cold War; modernization, conflicts, and revolutions in in Africa, Asia, Latin America; and the rise of religious fundamentalism at the end of the century. In addition to providing the 'who, what, when, and where' of twentieth-century history, this course will challenge students to explore why history matters by having them engage in a hands-on approach to historical study. Students will use primary sources (letters, period newspapers, photographs, political cartoons, sound recordings, period movies, etc.) to understand the significance of major historical events and their impact on the ordinary men and women who experienced them. In addition to providing the 'who, what, when, and where' of twentieth-century history, this course will challenge students to explore why history matters by having them engage in a hands-on approach to historical study. Students will use primary sources (especially period motion pictures) to understand the significance of major historical events and their impact on the ordinary men and women who experienced them.

HIST 231A: Soccer: A World History

3.00 Credits

Soccer today is a global multi-billion dollar business. The sport has become part of a gigantic entertainment and betting industry stretching across the planet. The international soccer association FIFA has more members than the United Nations (208). However, for hundreds of millions of fans and players, soccer is mostly what they love as 'amateurs' (from Latin amare). And, (modern) soccer has a history that goes back into 19th century England, from where engineers and businessmen brought the 'English disease' (soccer = 'Association football') to continental Europe, South America, and other places. In America, soccer had it more difficult to become a major national sport. What was the reason for that? This course offers insights into the fascinating social, economic, and cultural history of soccer, how the game spread over the globe, and why the tension between players, fans, and business is part of its success story.

HIST 235: Medieval World

3.00 Credits

This course offers a broad survey of medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500), a formative period in western society known for its soaring gothic cathedrals, the culture of chivalry, church and state power struggles, the crusades, the Black Death, Dante, and the emergence of the inquisition. We will examine western Christendom in the making by tracing the growth of its central institutions alongside its encounters with others'Pagans, Jews and Muslims'as it sought to expand its horizons and borders. Readings will emphasize primary sources in translation. No previous knowledge of the Middle Ages is assumed.

HIST 236A: The World of the Crusades

3.00 Credits

Hist 236a: The World of the Crusades will present an overview of the crusading movement from its origins in the eleventh century until the Conquistadors took crusading to the New World in the early sixteenth century. Special attention will be paid to changing conceptions of piety and violence, the Latin kingdoms in the eastern Mediterranean, and intercultural interactions

HIST 257: The Making of America, 1607-1877

3.00 Credits

The United States we know today was forged through centuries of hard-fought struggles. This course provides an overview of American History in the first 270 years. It surveys early contests between indigenous peoples and European empires, colonists' rebellion in the American Revolution, and political conundrums in the early United States. It also explains divisive economic transformations and immigration patterns, conflicts during westward expansion, women's and African Americans' demands for inclusion, reform efforts to overcome social ills, new religious awakenings, and struggles over slavery and the country's economic future. The course concludes with the accelerating centrifugal forces that brought the Civil War, and how Americans began rebuilding the fractured nation into a new society. Two lectures and one discussion per week; textbook and original historical documents.

HIST 258: Emerging Superpower: The United States, from 1877-1991

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to provide an introduction to important aspects of the social, political, and economic history of the United States from Reconstruction through the Vietnam War. The course will explore the nature of American citizenship as it has been forged and re-forged since Reconstruction. Key topics will include the rise of industrial capitalism, the impacts of immigration and urbanization, the emergence of mass consumer culture, the transformation of federal governance, the relationship of the United States to the rest of the world, and the ways in which mass social movements reshaped the nation's political culture, its institutions, and individuals' experiences. This course is intended for first years and sophomores.

HIST 280: The United States in the Nineteenth Century

3.00 Credits

This course surveys the history of the United States during the "long" nineteenth century (c. 1790 to 1920). Topics include: territorial expansion and economic development, antebellum politics and reform movements; slavery and the politics of sectionalism; the Civil War and Reconstruction; the making of an urban and industrial society; labor and agrarian protest; social, political and economic reform in Progressive America.

HIST 280B: The United States in the 20th Century

3.00 Credits

This course is intended to introduce students to the general narrative of United States history in the twentieth century. Major themes will include: 1) The racial legacy of the Civil War/Reconstruction 2) Domestic and foreign implications of U.S. economic dominance 3) The rise of the U.S. as a military power and the 'American project' 4) Evolution of modern American culture through the lens of mass media and religion 5) Political patterns dominated by liberal and conservative thought. We will use secondary and especially primary sources (original documents and audio and visual recordings) to investigate these issues during Friday discussion sections.

HIST 281: Colonial Latin America

3.00 Credits

Part I: Before independence. European and Indian background; conquest; religious, political, economic, and social structures; eighteenth-century reforms; independence movements.

HIST 282: Modern Latin America

3.00 Credits

Part II: Since independence. Nature of political, economic, and social problems, 1820-1965; histories of Mexico, Argentina, and Brazil.

HIST 300: Age of Discovery: Iberian World

3.00 Credits

Examines the motives and conduct of Spanish, Portuguese, and English explorers, as well as key conquests in the New World and Asia during the sixteenth century. Key figures include Columbus, de Gama, Magellan, Sir Francis Drake, Hernan Cortes, Francisco Pizarro, and Alfonso De Albuquerque.

HIST 301: Alexander 'the Great': From Myth to Man

3.00 Credits

This course will follow Alexander on his eastern expedition from Greece to India and back again, tracing his adventures from his boyhood (supposedly) under the tutelage of Aristotle to his death in Babylon. Focusing upon historical and archaeological resources for the study of Alexander and his world--texts, inscriptions, buildings and monuments, statuary, and coinage--it will examine the joint influences of the heroic tradition and of ancient Greek political culture upon the Alexander story. It will also explore the extent to which Alexander's own performative and commemorative choices may have affected his rapid transition 'from man to myth.'

HIST 302B: The Post-Roman World, 410-750

3.00 Credits

At the beginning of this period, we have something that still resembled a Roman Empire, and increasingly confident about its unified Christian identity. At the end of the period, that Roman Empire had shrunk to Greece and Turkey; old western provinces (Britain, France, Spain, and Italy) had become independent settler kingdoms; and the Middle East, Egypt, North Africa, and much of Spain were under the control of a new Islamic Empire, centered on Damascus. The Christians in these territories were now deeply and lastingly divided. It was an astonishing transformation, achieved in little over 300 years. How did it happen? What kept it from collapsing into complete chaos? What were its immediate effects? The course invites you to find out.

HIST 303: Mediterranean Society & Culture

3.00 Credits

The course will focus on shifts in political power and administration, although attention will also be paid to underlying geographical, economic, and ethnic factors. What distinguished an 'empire' from a 'kingdom,' early Byzantium from its Roman antecedents, the early Islamic Caliphate from the Greek and Persian polities it displaced? How did one identify a 'barbarian', a 'Hellene,' or an 'Arab'? What different senses could be applied to 'Christianity' or 'Islam'? The course will reach down to the eighth century'the beginnings of the 'Carolingian' period, the nature of Byzantine society before and during the Iconoclast Controversy, and the causes and immediate effects of the `Abb'sid 'revolution.'

HIST 304R: Constantine

3.00 Credits

This course on the history of the emperor Constantine is offered at CUA's Rome Program for students studying abroad.

HIST 305A: Ancient Christian Roots

3.00 Credits

The course will identify features of the earlier medieval religious world that had endured since late antiquity, albeit adapted to new circumstances. After considering terrain and material culture, we shall examine social, institutional, and cultural developments under such key headings as 'community,' 'leadership,' 'ceremony,' 'formation,' 'anthropology,' and 'art.' The course will open and close with a survey of the city of Rome immediately after 590 and immediately before 1073.

HIST 306: Women, Sex, Gender in the Middle Ages, 1100-1500

3.00 Credits

This course examines the experience of women in Western Europe during the later Middle Ages (ca. 1100-1500) and the contributions that women made to that culture. At the same time, the course examines how medieval gender systems were historically constructed and the implications of that construction for society and the sexes. The discussion component of the course introduces a broad range of primary sources available in translation along with methods of historical analysis and interpretation. Topics include: women and the law; work; marriage and family; religious life and experience; heresy and crime; scientific and medical discourses about women; literary and cultural production.

HIST 307: Comparative Colonial Systems, 1500-1800

3.00 Credits

Compares colonial structures of England, Portugal, France, and Spain, with particular emphasis on the relations of colonial societies to indigenous cultures and the impact of colonies on the development of the mother country.

HIST 307A: The Catholic Missionary Church in the Americas and Asia, 1500-1800

3.00 Credits

This course explores the history of Catholic missions in the Americas and Asia during the early modern period. Topics will include relations between missionaries, indigenous peoples, colonists, and crown officials during the conquest and settlement of the European empires; relations between Christians, Jews, and Muslims; the development of pastoral ideals and practices; America and Asia in European religious thought; and the comparative history of the Spanish and Portuguese empires. We will focus on the writings of early modern missionaries, especially Jesuits. Among the writers we will study are José de Acosta, Jean de Brébeuf, Bartolomé de las Casas, Ignatius of Loyola, Alexandre de Rhodes, António Vieira, and Francisco de Vitoria.

HIST 308: History of Byzantium and the Creation of the Orthodox World

3.00 Credits

Traces the transformation of the Eastern Roman Empire into the Byzantine Empire and the influence of the Empire on the development of Medieval Balkan and Eastern European society. Begins with the final split with the beleaguered Western Roman Empire in 395 and ends with the fall of Constantinople to the Crusades in 1204.

HIST 308A: The Modern Middle East

3.00 Credits

From Napoleon's invasion of Egypt in the 18th century to the Arab Spring and the emergence of ISIS in the 21st, this course surveys the politics, societies, cultures, and religious transformations of the Middle East, North Africa, and the wider Islamic world in the modern era. Major topics include the Islamic Middle East's incorporation into global economies and politics; modernist Islamic reform movements; European and American imperial intrusions; World War I and the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire; modern ethnic nationalisms (Arab, Turkish, and Zionist); authoritarian states in the twentieth-century Middle East; and the rise of Islamism, the Arab Spring, and oppositional politics. Our abiding concern will be the transformation of Middle Eastern and Islamic traditions through their encounters and struggles with global economic and political structures.

HIST 308B: Cities of the Islamic World

3.00 Credits

This is a survey course intended to expose students to the complex histories that colonial power, postcolonial politics, and globalization have played in the cities of the Islamic world. This course interrogates the experience of built environment in the context of historical trajectory stretching from colonialism, the rise of nation-states, postcolonial reframings to the contemporary practices of globalization. Through an analysis of selected cities, we will critically examine broader transformations in the social, political, and cultural history of the Islamic geography, particularly from the end of the 19th century and on. Some of the themes we will examine include, but are not limited to, orientalist imaginations, systems of governance and the immediacy of the colonial present, cities as sites of colonial spectacle, making capital cities, search for the local identity, urban modernities and nationalism, politics of housing and popular-class slums, and neoliberal urbanism. This course undertakes an interdisciplinary approach drawing from such fields as art history, geography, architecture, and political sociology. The course will provide in-depth analysis on the very imaginations of the Islamic geography, as they have been mapped, intervened in, and acted upon in diverse political and historical contexts. In addition to selected readings, the course will utilize resources including visual arts, literature, films, and videos.

HIST 309: The Rise of Islam

3.00 Credits

History 309 introduces students to the history and religious traditions of the Islamic Middle East and North Africa, including the areas ranging from Morocco in the west to Iran in the east. The course examines the period from the coming of Islam in the 7th century until the rule of the Mongol and Mamluk dynasties in the 13th-15th. Our points of focus include the Middle East's characteristic political and social institutions, the development of Islamic religious traditions, relations between Muslims and non-Muslims, and the social life of the region's diverse populations.

HIST 309B: Ancient Israel in its Near Eastern Context

3.00 Credits

This course covers the history of ancient Israel from the mid-2nd millennium BC up through the major Jewish revolts against Rome in the 1st and 2nd centuries AD. During the course of the semester, students will learn how modern historians assess the Bible as a historical resource, and will consult other sources from the ancient world, both textual and archaeological.

HIST 309C: Muslims, Christians and Jews in the Medieval Mediterranean

3.00 Credits

The medieval Mediterranean was a highly diverse world in which people of different faiths lived in close proximity, sometimes in peace and sometimes in tension. This course introduces students to that multi-religious milieu, with special attention to the interactions of communities of the three Abrahamic faiths ' Muslims, Christians, and Jews ' in areas ranging from Spain to the Arabic-speaking Middle East to Iran. Through both primary and secondary readings, we will examine the dynamics of these communities' social interaction and intellectual exchange as we consider how people in past societies dealt with religious difference.

HIST 310: Religion and Society in Medieval Europe, 300 - 1500

3.00 Credits

This course examines the role of religion and its impact on western Europe from the fourth to the fifteenth centuries. Relying mainly on primary source materials, topics covered in the course include: Christianization of the Roman world, asceticism, monasticism, missionaries, Church and State struggles, the Crusades, heresy, the mendicant orders, and lay piety. We will also examine our theme through pivotal medieval figures such as Hildegard of Bingen, Abelard and Heloise, Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena.

HIST 311: The Crusades

3.00 Credits

This course will present an overview of the crusading movement from its origins in the eleventh century to the fall of Constantinople to the Turks in 1453. We will examine the development of the ideology of holy war in both Europe and the Middle East, the conquest of Jerusalem and the establishment of the crusader states, the expansion of the crusades to encompass campaigns against heretics, northern European pagans, and even political opponents within Europe, and the ultimate decline of the crusading ideal in the later Middle Ages. We will also study the lasting impact of the crusades: their contributions to European art, architecture, and music, and their continued resonance in contemporary political debates concerning relations between the Islamic world and the West.

HIST 311B: Gunpowder Empires of Islam: the Ottomans, Safavids and Mughals

3.00 Credits

In the early modern period, while Spanish explorers were crossing the Atlantic, the Islamic world was dominated by three highly complex, religiously distinct empires. The Ottomans of Europe and the Middle East, the Safavids of Iran, and the Mughals of India have left us some of the world's major cultural landmarks, from the Taj Mahal to Istanbul's Blue Mosque. This course explores the major role played by these three empires in the history of the early modern world. In particular, we will examine each empire's society and economy, their relations and rivalries with each other, and their evolving connections to European powers from the 14th to the 19th centuries. A variety of secondary and primary sources will facilitate an in-depth view of three empires whose legacies are still felt in the modern societies of Europe, the Middle East, and South Asia.

HIST 312: Medieval Japan

3.00 Credits

Many enduring aspects of Japanese culture and society evolved during the earliest centuries of the archipelago's written history. This course explores Japan from its origins, through the classic Nara and Heian eras (710-1185 C.E) and the development of shogunate and daimyo in the Kamakura and Muromachi periods (1185-1568), to the beginnings of Tokugawa rule (from 1600 C.E.). Historians have often compared Japan during this period to the middle ages of European history; the comparison is controvesial, but worth exploring for what it reveals about ways of viewing historical time. Topics include Shinto and Buddhism, emperors and court culture, and the rise of militarism, samurai, and bushido. Students will analyse classic texts from the period, including The Tale of Genji, Sei Shonagon's Pillow Book, and The Tale of the Heike, as well as the archeological, artistic, and architectural legacies of early Japan.

HIST 312A: European Law from Antiquity to Napoleon

3.00 Credits

Law rules our lives, but there are few opportunities to study law as an undergraduate. This course will consider the major systems of law in European history--Roman law, feudal law, canon law, civil law, English common law--and will also pay attention to the changing understanding of natural law, the process of codification and the imposition of the Napoleonic Code on Europe, and the use of international law in the twentieth century. Law will be studied primarily through the lens of intellectual history, focusing on concepts, definitions, and principles, but the social and political implications of law will also be periodically addressed. Readings will include both excerpts from the great legal texts of the European past and scholarly overviews of legal history.

HIST 313A: Charlemagne and the Birth of Europe

3.00 Credits

Charlemagne's coronation as emperor in 800 marked the restoration of unity in much of Europe for the first time since the fall of Rome. This course will explore the history of Charlemagne and his dynasty, the Carolingians, and their impact on European society. The Carolingian era saw the origin of the economic might which would power Europe into the modern world, the cultural flourishing which determined our knowledge of the Latin classical heritage, transformations in family structure and the idea of marriage, and the construction of political forms which persisted to the nineteenth century. The course will consider how the Carolingians rebuilt European society out of the ruins of Rome, and will argue that the ways in which they did this helped shape the later history of the Middle Ages and indeed, Europe.

HIST 316: England After the Black Death

3.00 Credits

English history circa 1300-1500 witnessed major upheavals and transformations. The course begins by considering the Black Death (and, more generally, the role of disease in history) and covers this period topically, emphasizing political, social and economic, and cultural change and analysis of primary sources.

HIST 317: Italy in the Age of Dante

3.00 Credits

This course examines the history of medieval Italy from the period of the barbarian invasions of the fifth century to the mid-Trecento. It is an age well known for the glittering Byzantine mosaics at Ravenna, the brilliant Norman court at Palermo, the gentle spirituality of Saint Francis, and the vernacular poetry of Dante, each topics considered in this course through primary sources in translation. Other topics include Guelf/Ghibelline politics, the commune and the contado, long-distance trade and commerce, artistic patronage and heritage, the family, education, religious life and popular devotion.

HIST 317A: Modern Italy since 1860

3.00 Credits

How did Italy become what it is today? This course looks at the modern history of Italy by focusing on political, economic, social, and cultural developments since the time when Italian intellectuals began to discover Italy as a nation. Lectures and discussions will also study Italy's modern history in a European context in order to better understand what is specific of Italian history and what is part of broader European developments.

HIST 319A: American Religious History

3.00 Credits

This course will examine religion in American life from the arrival of Europeans on the North American continent to the present. We will explore the impact religion has had on American society, culture, and politics, and how various faith traditions have been shaped, in turn, by their encounter with America. Courses themes will include the development of religious pluralism, the relationship between religion in the U.S. and the larger world, the persistence of religion in American culture, and American religious identity.

HIST 322: Tyrants and Vagabonds

3.00 Credits

The major outlines of political change from the founding of the Tudor dynasty to the English Civil War provide the background for a more detailed survey of English society. Economic and demographic changes; selected topics of social history receive special attention: the histories of the family, community, religion, riots and revolts, and popular culture.

HIST 323: The Renaissance, 1300-1530

3.00 Credits

A survey of the intellectual and cultural life of western Europe from 1300 to 1530, with particular attention to the revival of classical literary and artistic forms and to the emergence of a new view of human nature and of the world.

HIST 325: Europe in the Reformation Era, 1500-1648

3.00 Credits

An examination of the political, socioeconomic, intellectual, and religious backgrounds and the careers and teachings of the magisterial and radical reformers both on the continent and in England. Also studied are the Catholic reforms and the religious wars and peace movements.

HIST 326A: Britain and the Second World War

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 326B: British Empire

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 326C: The British Empire and the First World War

3.00 Credits

This course will investigate the First World War as a transformative event for the British Empire. The empire reached its largest territorial expanse at the conclusion of the First World War, and yet, the war is often seen as an important turning point toward imperial decline. In the course, we will consider the extent to which the First World War was in fact the `beginning of the end' for the British Empire. Using a variety of primary and secondary sources, the course will examine the wartime experiences of settler and non-settler colonies, paying particular attention to themes of nationalism, resistance, and globalization.

HIST 327: Twentieth-Century Britain

3.00 Credits

An examination of Britain from the death of Victoria to the defeat of Margaret Thatcher in 1990. Charts the changing fortunes of Britain in the twentieth century, from imperial power to middle-rank European nation. Topics include the experience and impact of total war; experiments with social citizenship; and decolonization and the decline of imperial prestige.

HIST 328A: From Shakespeare to Sheridan: The Irish in the Theatre, 1600-1775

3.00 Credits

This course examines how plays staged in London and Dublin between 1600 and 1775 represented Ireland, its history, and inhabitants. The students will read the most important dramatic literature concerning Ireland written during this period, including the works of: William Shakespeare, Roger Boyle, Thomas Shadwell, William Congreve, George Farquhar, Oliver Goldsmith, and Richard Brinsley Sheridan. In addition to reading and discussing the plays, the students will tour the city and learn firsthand how Dublin's streets, walls, castles, churches, and greens served as a backdrop for a social drama in which the kingdom's subjects performed as different characters. We will visit Dublin Castle, Trinity College, Christchurch and St. Patrick's Cathedral, Archbishop Marsh's Library, the Old Parliament Building, the Royal Hospital, and the Georgian homes along Merrion and Fitzwilliam Squares. We will also tour the city's theatres and attend at least two performances. We will visit the building that housed John Ogilby's Smock Alley Theatre and examine the theatre's original foundation. This was the most important playhouse in Ireland between 1662 and 1787. This course is offered through CUA's Irish Summer Institute.

HIST 329: History Of British Cinema

3.00 Credits

An exploration of British cinema from its origins until the present day. Focuses on the production and distribution of British films, as well as provides an analysis of specific films important to a history of cinema as an art form and medium of mass communication.

HIST 329A: The Family in European History

3.00 Credits

This course will begin with a brief examination of family law in antiquity and the structure of the European medieval family before considering the transformation of the family in the early modern period, particularly in response to the Reformation and the rise of the nation state. Although the Renaissance is often described as the birthplace of modern individualism, the early modern period can just as easily be seen as dominated by families who employed cultural strategies to increase their collective reputation and power. The course will finish by examining the challenges to the modern European family in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. A wide range of experiences will be covered, from the family life of royalty and aristocracy to the demographic and legal evidence of everyday life in the homes of artisans and peasants. The social and economic pressures that shaped the family will be discussed, as well as debates over the emotional life of the early modern family. Readings will include letters, journals, legal documents, instructional pamphlets, sermons, novels, and moralizing treatises.

HIST 330A: The Celtic World: People and Mythology

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the history, literature, art, and archeology of the people known as the Celts. We will look at the evidence for and against the concept of a 'Celtic' civilization in classical times, and we will trace the distinctive history of the so-called 'Celtic Fringe' in the British Isles: Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. We will also study the rediscovery (or invention) of the Celts in modern times, focusing on the Gaelic Revival in Ireland and recent nationalist movements in Scotland, Wales, Brittany, and Galicia. Throughout, we will analyze the fascinating relationship between the 'facts' of the historical record and the cultural and political impact of the concept of the 'Celt.'

HIST 331A: Early Modern Europe, 1450 - 1750

3.00 Credits

This course covers the Renaissance, the voyages of discovery, the Reformation, the wars of religion, the Thirty Years' War, the Scientific Revolution, the rise of the nation-state, and the Enlightenment.

HIST 331B: Fashion and Society Since 1500

3.00 Credits

Fashion is a text for society that communicates about the individual, even if fashion constantly creates a tension between uniformity and individuality. It is a social construction of what is regarded as appropriate. As with any aspect of human behavior so fundamental, there are many ways to examine the phenomenon of human dress. In this course we will focus on the discourse in which social, economic, political, cultural ideas are expressed through the medium of clothing. One of the main topics is the development of modern styles of fashion in Europe and what impact these had on the rest of the world, particularly in the context of colonialism and the rise of a global textile industry.

HIST 332: The French Revolution

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the French Revolution, a pivotal event that ushered in modernity while forever changing the political landscape of Europe. The revolution will be considered in its context, with a look at both the ancien régime that preceded it and the reverberations that followed it in the nineteenth century. The interaction between culture and politics will be highlighted throughout the course, with particular focus on public opinion, reason, anti-dogmatism, secularism, religion, and the creation of conservative resistance. A major theme will be the relationship between ideas and events.

HIST 332A: Medieval Paris

3.00 Credits

Paris became, in the thirteenth century, the cultural heart of Europe, home to the strongest monarchy of the period, the new university of Paris, and developments in art, literature, and music. This course will explore how this vibrant cultural capital came to be. We will consider the early history of Paris as a Roman settlement, and home to important saints' cults, as well as its growing strength under the French kings Philip Augustus and Louis IX, the famous saint-king. The core of the course will focus on the growing metropolis of the thirteenth century, with attention to its scholarship, its art, its rulers, and its population, from kings to the poor.

HIST 333A: East Asia Since 1600

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 333B: Modern China

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 334A: Modern Germany, 1870 to the Present

3.00 Credits

This course provides an overview of the history of Modern Germany from the foundation of the nation state in the second half of the 19th century to its dissolution at the end of World War II. In addition, the years following its dissolution in 1945 are also discussed, as well as long-term developments regarding gender, sexuality, religion or militarism. Apart from dealing with the general political, economic and social history of Germany, special emphasis is laid on the study of the different cultures of the succeeding German states.

HIST 337: The Science of Man: Great Works of Modern Social Thoughts

3.00 Credits

"This course examines the great works of modern social science, works of ongoing interest and influence that have achieved the status of classics. Each work is studied in its historical context, with an eye to bringing out the themes of perennial interest for the study of society, politics, economics psychology and culture. Those studied include Hobbes, Adam Smith, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud Weber, Durkheim and Simmel."

HIST 337C: Russia Since 1900

3.00 Credits

This class will explore the history of the Soviet Union; it is intended for those who have never before studied Russian history. It has three parts: the creation of the Soviet Union, the Soviet Union after Stalin and the dissolution of the Soviet empire. Its first part begins with the situation of the Russian empire at the time of the First World War. It proceeds to the Bolshevik Revolution and the Russian civil war, focusing on the figure of Vladimir Lenin and his vision of Soviet communism in the 1920s. It will proceed to the era of Joseph Stalin, which began approximately in 1928 and ended with Stalin's death in 1953: Stalin's consolidation of power, his use of the five-year-plans, his prosecution of the 'great terror' in the late 1930s, his leadership during the Second World War and his postwar political and foreign-policy aspirations. This course's second part traces the Soviet system administered by Khurshchev and Brezhnev, emphasizing not just politics and not just the Cold War but cultural and everyday life within the postwar Soviet Union. The third part will review the major explanations of the Soviet Union's collapse, from dissident movements to technological backwardness, and it will devote considerable attention to the consequences of this collapse, to the redrawing of the geopolitical map in 1989 and 1991 and to the legacy Soviet history has left in Russia, Ukraine and the countries of Eastern Europe. This course will attempt to characterize the nature of Soviet politics, from Lenin to Gorbachev, by looking closely at the Soviet Union's sources of legitimacy and at the instability that is a recurrent theme in Soviet history. It will cover the national and ethnic composition of the Soviet Union as well as the cultural and religious questions that mattered to Soviet citizens, both within and outside the Kremlin.

HIST 337D: History of the Present: Introduction to Global History

3.00 Credits

This course will introduce students to global history. Its immediate theme is the Ukraine crisis. The course will include "live" journalism, which is to say events that are occurring while the class is being taught. The course will also involve a historical investigation into the causes and background of this crisis. Relevant actors will include Russia, Ukraine, the United States and the member states of the European Union: these multiple actors will shed light on what can be called global history. A major theme will be the legacy of the Cold War and break-up of the Soviet Union. More broadly, this class will focus on history's relationship to the crises of the present, offering students a way to peer beyond the headlines, on the one hand, and a way to apply historical insight to contemporary issues on the other.

HIST 338A: The Idea of Europe. European Integration since 1914

3.00 Credits

After WWII, and in the context of the Cold War, Europeans witnessed the transnational integration process that resulted in the foundation of the European Union (EU) in 1992. However, the road to the EU was long and cumbersome, and beset by conflicts and crises. The decision to limit national sovereignty for the sake of a union of European nations was contested from the beginning. For that reason European integration has remained a fragile enterprise. This course focuses on historical process by which European identity was built. The first part of the course provides an overview of the debates on European integration since 1914. The second half of the course focuses on more current issues related to EU institutions and the problem of creating an EU identity.

HIST 339A: Capitalism in Modern Western Thought

3.00 Credits

This course deals with the ways in which leading thinkers in Europe and the United States from the eighteenth century to the present have thought about capitalism, including its moral, cultural, economic, political and familial implications. It provides a basic history of capitalism in the West, as well as frameworks for understanding and evaluating it, drawn from a variety of academic disciplines and ideological perspectives.

HIST 340: Modern European Intellectual History I

3.00 Credits

Examines the major trends and great individual works of modern European thought by situating them in their historical contexts, with an emphasis on the development of social and political thought. First semester: the Enlightenment to the mid-nineteenth century; explorations of works by Voltaire, Hume, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Edmund Burke, the Romantics, Hegel, Marx, Hobbes, Locke, Mill, and others.

HIST 340A: Mapping History

3.00 Credits

Making sense of spaces and places is essential for studying history. This course offers a grounding in understanding and constructing maps as tools for historical problems, and as one subset of the recent development of digital humanities. Topics include the global history of maps; how maps are made and how to decode them; and how historians have used maps to explore particular issues in history. As a final project, students will create electronic maps with data. The course is not limited to any particular time or region: it will include examples from ancient, medieval, and modern, and European, American, and other settings.

HIST 341: Modern European Intellectual History II

3.00 Credits

Continues from 340. Second semester: the period from the late nineteenth century to the present; begins with the critique of liberalism and rationalism in the works of Nietzsche, Pareto, and Freud; examines Durkheim, Weber, and the rise of sociology; the intellectual reaction to the First World War, to communism and to fascism; and the reformation of liberal, conservative, and radical thought in the later twentieth century.

HIST 343A: Debating American Conservatism

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 343B: Liberalism & Conservatism

3.00 Credits

This course explores the development of liberal and conservative thought in Europe and the United States from the eighteenth through the late twentieth centuries. It focuses on great public policy debates between liberals and conservatives on issues of liberty, security, marriage, and the legitimacy of various sorts of inequality; and examines issues related to government, the family, and the economy. Readings are from primary sources.

HIST 346: Triumph and Catastrophe: The Habsburg Empire (1792-1920).

3.00 Credits

Until its sudden collapse in 1918, the Empire of the Habsburg dynasty dominated the central part of Europe. No less than 12 European states of today share this legacy. Some compare the governance of the 'multinational' Habsburg Empire with its complex structure of imperial, national, regional, provincial, and local institutions and their complicated interplay with the current processes and challenges of European integration. But the history of the Habsburg Empire goes way beyond the simplistic tale of growing nationalist tensions which led to the outbreak of the Great War. Austria-Hungary was also a laboratory of modern experience and modern ideas and ideologies, from antisemitism to psychoanalysis - ideas which radically shaped the short and catastrophic 20th century.

HIST 348: America and the World

3.00 Credits

America and the world explores American diplomatic history from the First World War to the Iraq War. It puts particular emphasis on the promise and perils of democracy promotion as a mainstay of American foreign policy. This class also places key turning points in the fashioning of American foreign policy in a global context. It examines not just the evolution of American policies but the personalities, political dynamics and social forces that have driven this evolution. Though very much an inquiry into the past, this course will, when relevant, make use of contemporary developments for the sake of better analyzing and discussing the historical record.

HIST 348A: America in War, Peace, and Depression, 1900-1950

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 348B: Researching Media History & Archival Analysis

3.00 Credits

"Students focus on learning historical research methods, utilizing primary documents, sound materials, and digital humanities tools at the Library of Congress, toward the development of an original publication-length paper on broadcasting, film, or communications policy history. With the aid of the instructor and designated archival staff members, students craft proposals and writing samples useful for applications to film and media, communications, or cultural history graduate programs, as well as think tanks, research agencies, and content development fields."

HIST 348C: Vice in America

3.00 Credits

The definition of vice in this class will usually be the legal one (including gambling, prostitution, illegal sales of alcohol, the sale of narcotics, and pornography), but we will also deal with behavior considered to be immoral or wicked ' the sort that inspired the 'blue laws' of the 19th century. The fundamental question the course seeks to address is 'what do attitudes toward vice tell us about American culture and society?' We will see that the United States has a long history of permitting vice, sometimes legally, sometimes tacitly. At the same time, societal tolerance and even acceptance of vice could change rapidly due to a confluence of cultural, political, societal, economic, and religious concerns, leading to social reform. Although the course will deal with American history from the colonial era to the present, it will not be comprehensive. Instead, we will use case studies found in secondary sources to ask how the nature of vice has changed, how could the definition of vice be used as a means of social control, and who wielded that social control?

HIST 349: Washington: Symbol and City

3.00 Credits

Examines the history of Washington, DC, in the context of the larger history of American urbanization. The course makes extensive use of Washington's resources, with numerous field trips and classes at various city locales.

HIST 350: Europe Since 1945

3.00 Credits

The history of Europe, west and east, since the end of the Second World War. Topics include the division of Germany, the communization of eastern Europe, the development of the welfare state, decolonization, the New Left, the dilemmas of the welfare state, the collapse of communism and the attempt to build democratic societies in eastern Europe. The several film screening will be held on Wednesday evenings, in place of class hours. Requirements include a mid-term, a final examination, and a short paper.

HIST 353: The Era of Civil War and Reconstruction

3.00 Credits

Investigates the military, political, social, and economic aspects of the war that sundered the United States in 1861. Topics include: the background of the sectional crisis; military events and political affairs during the war; the experiences of Americans on the battlefield and the home front; the destruction of slavery; and the post-war reconstruction of the South and the nation.

HIST 353A: Abraham Lincoln in History and Memory

3.00 Credits

This course will explore the life, presidency, and public memory of America's 16th President. By reading historians' accounts as well as the words of Lincoln and his contemporaries, we will examine his multiple roles: as antebellum lawyer and politician; as wartime executive and commander in chief; as public orator and man of ideas. We will also study how successive generations have commemorated his presidency and made him such a potent symbol for the meaning and promise of America's past.

HIST 357: Hist of Old South 1607-1865

3.00 Credits

This course surveys the history of the U.S. South from the founding of Jamestown through the Civil War. It examines the origins and development of plantation slavery and racial ideology; the intertwined histories of masters, slaves, and non-slaveowning white Southerners; the growth of the sectional conflict; and the Confederacy?s attempt to establish an independent slaveowning republic.

HIST 357A: US South Since The Civil War

3.00 Credits

This course will survey the history of the American South from the end of the Civil War through the current day. Its purposes are two-fold: to provide students an understanding of the South and of Southerners, and to explore what the experience of the South can teach us about America as a nation. Through primary and secondary readings, lectures, and class discussions we will examine such topics as: the political and economic reconstruction of the South after the Civil War; the Populist revolt; the politics of race in the era of Jim Crow and disfranchisement; the rise of the 'Sunbelt' South; the Civil Rights movement; and the question of persisting regional distinctiveness.

HIST 358: Interwar America: 1919-1941

3.00 Credits

This course examines one of the most turbulent and influential periods in modern American history: the years between the First and Second World Wars. Through the use of primary sources (including radio broadcasts, movies, and field trips) and secondary sources, we will consider the social, cultural, political, and economic ramifications of such topics as the economic boom and cultural revolution of the 1920s, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and the United States' relationship with the world.

HIST 358A: US in Depression and War, 1929-1945

3.00 Credits

This course covers the Great Depression, the New Deal, and World War Two.

HIST 358B: Postwar America: 1945-2001, A Restless Superpower

3.00 Credits

This class will focus on the decades following the Second World War and address two main themes; America's transformation into a global superpower and the significant social changes that took place during this period. The class will examine topics such as; the Cold War, the rise of suburbia and the growing middle class, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the protest movements of the 1960's, the expanding role of women in American life, the rise of the Conservative Movement, Watergate, the conclusion of the Cold War, and America's role in a globalized world.

HIST 360: U.S. Immigration & Ethnicity

3.00 Credits

This course traces successive waves of immigration to the United States, beginning in the 1840s and continuing to the present day. It examines American attitudes and responses to immigration over the generations, including laws governing immigration and citizenship, and the various immigrant reactions to these. It also examines community building among various immigrant populations and the ethnic groups this ultimately gave rise to. In this regard, the course explores immigrant and ethnic religion, education, politics, patterns of work and sociability, and attitudes toward assimilation.

HIST 362: Nazism

3.00 Credits

Examines the roots of Nazism in German political culture before and during the First World War, the failure of Germany's first liberal democratic republic, the rise of National Socialism and the consolidation of Hitler's totalitarian regime; the attempt to recast Europe in the mold of Nazi racial ideology during World War II and the systematic murder of European Jewry. Concludes with a look at the aftermath of National Socialism in Germany.

HIST 367: Empires, Indians, and Colonists in America, 1492-1763

3.00 Credits

Old Worlds collided and a New World began when European explorers and Native Americans came face to face. This is the story of how colonists settled and missionaries swarmed, how some Indians welcomed them and others pushed back, and how fortunes grew and empires went to war. We also examine why pirates pillaged, witches were hanged, slaves revolted, and prophets began new religions. Using a variety of original records, this course traces the rise of the British, Dutch, and French empires and powerful Native American counterparts. Topics include: exploration and settlement; Native American cultures and trade; the Caribbean; slavery and immigration; commerce and piracy; everyday life and the material world; religion and politics.

HIST 369: US Civil Rights Movement, 1945-Present

3.00 Credits

After briefly surveying developments in U.S. race relations from Reconstruction through the Second World War, this course explores in depth the civil rights activism and politics of the 1950s and 1960s. The latter portion of the course examines the evolution of such "post-Movement" policies as busing and affirmative action and traces the course of American race relations since the 1970s.

HIST 370: Religion and Society in the Early Modern World

3.00 Credits

This course analyzes religion, politics, and society in Europe and the European empires (especially the British and Spanish empires), ca. 1450-ca. 1700. Readings will focus on primary sources. Among the topics to be studied are relations between Catholics, Protestants, Jews, and other non-Christian peoples; the lives and works of Erasmus, Thomas More, and Martin Luther; the Inquisition in Spain and Portugal; imperial rivalries in their political and religious contexts; the development of biblical criticism; and religious toleration.

HIST 371A: Colonial Latin America

3.00 Credits

The history of Colonial Latin America contains numerous dramatic and compelling narratives: exploration and new encounters; competing religious visions and missions; the formation of new social orders; and countless examples of hegemony, counter-hegemony, resistance, and survival. In this class we will explore all of these themes by studying the narrative history of Latin America from just before the arrival of Columbus in 1492 until the Independence period of the early 19th century. Topics will include pre-contact indigenous and European societies; initial encounters and the formation of a new Colonial order; the role of religion and the Catholic Church in Latin America; slavery and social relations in Colonial life; the Bourbon Reforms; Independence and the establishment of new nations.

HIST 371B: Modern Latin America

3.00 Credits

This course examines the history of modern Latin America, a complex and dynamic region whose nations share a common colonial heritage, but have developed along very different trajectories. We will cover the period from Independence to the present, examining the following themes in depth: new nations, the age of the caudillo, export-led growth, immigration and urbanization, the Mexican Revolution, the Latin American Left, populism, the post-war period, the Cuban Revolution, Central American conflicts, and the contemporary period. We will pay particular attention to the political history of the region, and especially to the relationship between Latin America and the United States.

HIST 371C: Cuba: From Colony to Cold War

3.00 Credits

This course examines the history of Cuba, beginning with the arrival of Spanish conquistadors and continuing through the colonial period, independence, U.S. intervention, the Cuban Revolution and the Cold War period. Using secondary and primary sources - including paintings, photographs, films, and music - we will pay close attention to the outsize role played by this small island in global politics, economics, and culture.

HIST 373A: American Religious History

3.00 Credits

This course will examine religion in American life from the arrival of Europeans on the North American continent to the present. We will explore the impact religion has had on American society, culture, and politics, and how various faith traditions have been shaped, in turn, by their encounter with America. Courses themes will include the development of religious pluralism, the relationship between religion in the U.S. and the larger world, the persistence of religion in American culture, and American religious identity.

HIST 373B: Politics and Religion in 20th Century U.S. History

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 374: The Rise of American Slavery and Its Defeat, 1492-1865

3.00 Credits

This course traces the dramatic rise and fall of slavery in America and explores connections to the Caribbean, Latin America, and Africa. Students use original sources to illuminate the everyday lives of enslaved people, including family, cultural life, religion, and rebellion. We grapple with important questions: Why did masters go all the way to Africa for slaves? How did Latin American slavery evolve differently and influence other regions? How did African Americans shape their lives under a system of exploitation? Why did abolition movements emerge, what was the role of Christianity, and how was slavery finally defeated? Students use sources such as interviews with liberated slaves, business ledgers, newspapers, letters, and archaeology to piece together a global story that is foundational to American history.

HIST 375: Revolutionary America and the Early Republic

3.00 Credits

Revolutionary America examines the creation of an independent United States and a new republican society through the contested ideal of liberty. The course explores Americans' struggles over government power, religious liberty, and slavery in the Revolutionary era from the 1730s, when religious revivals unsettled traditional leaders, to the early 1800s, when the era's voluntary associations became flash points for conflicts over the exercise of authority by women, African Americans, and religious groups. Near the end of the semester, students will provide a briefing on the history of religious liberty in the early United States to a public audience.

HIST 376A: The First World War, 1914 - 1918

3.00 Credits

This course examines the First World War in terms of its social political, economic, cultural, and military impacts, both on Western Europe as well as Africa, Asia, and North America. Drawing on a range of primary sources, including government documents, personal narratives, fictional accounts, and film, the course places the First World War in global perspective.

HIST 377: World War II

3.00 Credits

Major developments in American foreign policy from the American Revolution to the end of World War II. Special attention to the development and modification of ideas and principles in the evolution of American diplomacy in the nineteenth century and the impact of the various presidents and their secretaries of state.

HIST 377A: World War II in Europe

3.00 Credits

Drawing on military, political, social and cultural approaches, 'this course offers a wide-ranging description and analysis of the European theater of war, 1939-1945. One major goal is to describe the ways ideology affected the balance of power, then influenced strategy, operations, and tactics. Further, the course will examine the ways that large-scale war acts as a revolutionary social and cultural force, and the ways that the Second World War created what we think of as the modern world, not only in political terms (the roots of the Cold War; the collapse of European imperialism) but also in radically changing the relationship of the individual to the State. The course will assess and challenge many of the myths surrounding the war, such as resistance and collaboration, and illuminate the moral compromises necessary to survive in occupied societies of Europe. Finally, we will challenge some of the received ideas about the war, such as the relative importance of campaigns in East and West and Asia. The construction of historical memory will feature as a theme with implications to all study of modern history and how we receive our understanding of the past.

HIST 379: The Cold War 1945-1975

3.00 Credits

The development of American policies toward the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and mainland China from World War II to the 1970s. The influence of domestic political policies and the role of the United Nations, as well as major aspects of historical interpretation of the period.

HIST 379A: The Vietnam War

3.00 Credits

This course will provide students with an introduction to the Vietnam War. It will cover the major political and military factors that led to this war. It will review the evolution of this long war, from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s, focusing primarily on the United States, though incorporating the history of Vietnam and of the larger region as well. In addition to historical scholarship, this course will explore journalism, memoirs, literature, cinema and memorials in order to assess the war's impact on American culture.

HIST 379B: The Legacy of Political Satire

3.00 Credits

This course will explore the rich legacy of political satire focusing on examples from literature, film and the graphic arts. It will have a focus on American material but will not be limited to this focus. In addition to discussion and analysis of the given works - which will range from Jonathan Swift to Mark Twain to Charlie Chaplin and beyond - this course will examine the historical and political context around these works. It will also investigate the social function of satire as well as satire's relation to to formal or official politics.

HIST 380: The Irish in America

3.00 Credits

Addresses the history of the Irish in the United States as a case study in the history of American immigrants and ethnicity. Examines how Irish American definitions of identity, cultural practices and beliefs, and even group boundaries changed over time, and how Irish American experiences varied in different regions of the country. Traces the story from the seventeenth century to the 1960s and 1970s, but focuses most heavily on the period since the Famine migration in the 1840s and 1850s. Addresses such topics as Irish American Catholicism, nationalism, family and gender roles, and politics.

HIST 380A: Medieval Ireland to 1607

3.00 Credits

Ireland has been invaded repeatedly throughout its history. Each wave of new arrivals has caused a renegotiation of what it means to be 'Irish.' This course will engage directly with that question by surveying Irish society and culture from pre-Christian times down to the end of the old Gaelic order in 1607. We will glance at Irish prehistory and then examine 'Celtic' society--its social structure, laws and literature. Next, we will trace the impact of the Christianization of Ireland on this society. We will look at the effect on Ireland of invasions by the Vikings and the Normans, and the establishment of English rule in Ireland. We will then study the varying fortunes of the competing groups in Irish society (Gaelic Irish and Anglo-Irish), analyze the advent of the Reformation in Ireland, and examine the final conquest of Ireland in the reign of Elizabeth I and the passing of the old order. The class emphasizes active learning. Along with traditional lectures, there will be both discussions and structured exercises, with a focus on analyzing primary sources in their historical context.

HIST 380B: The Capetian Dynasty: A Survey of Medieval France in the High Middle Ages

3.00 Credits

In the year 987 AD, the kingdom of France experienced a dynastic shift from the long-standing royal family, the Carolingians, to the new Capetian dynasty that would reign for over three hundred years. During this formative period in French history, the kingdom and its inhabitants experienced a number of changes and challenges. This course will trace chronologically the history of medieval France in the High Middle Ages (950-1350) and introduce students to such broad themes as the centralization of royal authority; the feudal structure; the culture of chivalry; the rise of medieval towns; the appearance of medieval universities; the renaissance of the twelfth century; and the role of the Church in society, and themes unique to France, including the foreign conquests of England, Sicily, and the Crusades; the innovation of Gothic architecture; the Albigensian Crusade in southern France; and the Avignon Papacy. Readings will emphasize primary sources in translation. No previous knowledge of the Middle Ages is assumed.

HIST 380C: Modern Ireland: The British Centuries, 1600-1973

3.00 Credits

As Britain's oldest colonial appendage, Ireland's status was altogether particular, and this course will investigate the particularities, and indeed peculiarities, of this unique relationship over a period of four centuries, from the ambitious land plantations of the seventeenth century to the problematic and bloody settlements of the twentieth. The course will examine just how Britain shaped Irish politics, economics, society, religion, culture and, indeed, its patterns of global migration. However much nationalists might have insisted that Ireland was altogether 'Irish', this course will show that Ireland was also - to a greater or lesser extent - British. But it will also show how, as the centuries progressed, Ireland increasingly undertook to reshaping itself in response, and sometimes in violent reaction to this massive assertion of imperial dominion.

HIST 380D: Ireland, 1541-1800: Kingdom, Colony, Province (and Nation?)

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 381: California, Texas and the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

3.00 Credits

We will study the political, religious, cultural and economic history of Texas, California and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands from the Spanish conquest to the present. Among the themes that we will study are the exploration and settlement of northern Mexico and the lands that are now the southwestern and western U.S.; the California, Texas and Sonora missions, the work of Junipero Serra and other missionaries, and the role of the Catholic church in social and political movements in the U.S. and Mexico; key figures in the history of the region, from the conquistador Francisco Vázquez de Coronado to President Lyndon Johnson; international migration; and the growing importance of Latino communities in U.S. politics and society. Readings will include works of history and social science as well as a wide range of primary sources, including missionary reports, travel narratives, newpapers, letters, memoirs and novels.

HIST 383A: Latinos in the US

3.00 Credits

This course explores the political, cultural, social, and economic history of Latino communities in the United States from the Mexican War to the present. We will focus on Mexican Americans in California, Texas and the southwest but will also explore the comparative history of the communities of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Central American origin in the U.S. We will study the cultural and religious traditions of Latino communities; border policy and the history of Mexican migration to the U.S.; racial and class discrimination; migrant labor in the U.S.; and the role of Latino communities in national and regional politics. Readings will include works of history and social science as well as a wide range of primary sources, including memoirs, novels, films, music, newspapers and government documents.

HIST 384: The Church in Latin America, 1492-Present

3.00 Credits

Examines how economic and political change interacted with social transformations in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Latin America. Topics include the changing social and economic roles of women, family structures, slavery and abolition, immigration, urbanization, and impact of change on Indian communities.

HIST 386: Modern Mexico

3.00 Credits

Readings in economic, social, and political development of Mexico, 1900 to the present.

HIST 387A: Junior Seminar

3.00 Credits

This junior research seminar develops skills in research, historiography, analysis, and writing.

HIST 395A: The Victorians

3.00 Credits

This course explores the lives and times of the Victorians (c. 1837-1901). Drawing on a range of primary sources, including parliamentary documents, memoir, song, poetry, fiction, and newspaper journalism, the course places the Victorians in their political, social, cultural, religious, economic and global contexts.

HIST 410: Seminar: Persecution and Tolerance in the Medieval Mediterranean

3.00 Credits

This course introduces history majors to the craft of writing history, or explaining and interpreting the past. It has two main components. In the first half of the course, students are introduced to and grapple with the problem of historiographical debate by reading and writing responses to multiple works of scholarship that approach the same historical question from different perspectives and reach different conclusions. This semester, that question is 'tolerance and persecution of religious minorities in the medieval Mediterranean.' In the second component of the course, students use their experience dissecting a historiographical debate to write an original research paper related to the course's theme. Analyzing historiography and doing original research are the first step toward a successful senior thesis that this course facilitates. The course is open to junior and second-semester sophomore history majors. Other students require departmental approval.

HIST 411: Seminar: Witch-hunting in Colonial America

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 412: Seminar: Martin Luther and the Reformation in Germany

3.00 Credits

This class is a research seminar that prepares students to write a senior thesis. We replicate the senior thesis experience in miniature, as each student will produce a paper that argues an original thesis, using primary sources as evidence and situating the work in the midst of historiographical debates. Our general topic will be Martin Luther and the German Reformation, a broad subject out of which each student will choose a small line of inquiry that he or she finds particularly compelling.

HIST 413: Seminar: English Crime, 1200-1800

3.00 Credits

This seminar's aim is to help participants develop critical skills as part of their development as students of history, as well as to provide practice for senior thesis projects. In order to accomplish those goals, the seminar consists of an in-depth exercise in looking at approaches, methods, sources, and ways of understanding historical problems, worked out in the context of a specific topic or subject: in this case, the history of crime in England, circa 1200-1800. Studying crime lends itself to many approaches: legal, sociological, statistical, comparative (across times and places), and cultural/literary, to name only a few. Emphasis will be upon analyzing primary sources (especially court cases) alongside wide-ranging examples from recent writing about the history of crime.

HIST 414: Seminar: The U.S. and Latin American Revolutions

3.00 Credits

This course investigates the response of the United States to Latin American revolutions during the twentieth century. Beginning with the Mexican Revolution in 1910 and including the Guatemalan Revolution of 1944-54, the Cuban Revolution of 1959, and others, we will investigate several cases in which the U.S. became involved politically, militarily, or strategically in Latin American revolutions. We will pay special attention to the role and activities of the U.S. armed forces, the CIA, and the U.S. Department of State. We will discuss events and actors including Pershing's expedition to Mexico, the Bay of Pigs invasion, Operation Mongoose, and the United Fruit Company. Students are expected to write a 15-20 page research paper on topic related to the theme of the course, making use of English-language primary sources.

HIST 415: Seminar: Civility, Savagery, and Rebellion in the British Atlantic, 1600-1800

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 422: Magna Carta in England and America

3.00 Credits

The American system of law and government is deeply indebted to developments that took place in medieval and early modern England. This seminar will explore how English government evolved by focusing on the relationship between English kings and the expanding political classes. Beginning with the Norman Conquest, we will examine how the need to pay for wars fought for dynastic and other reasons led the English kings to bargain with their nobles and knights for taxes in exchange for a greater voice in the running of the kingdom. We will spend the bulk of the course on Magna Carta, which started out as a treaty between members of the English elite and evolved into a charter of liberties for all Englishmen. Magna Carta then became one of the chief inspirations for the American Founding Fathers. We will look closely at the birth of the English Common Law, the rise of parliament, and the confrontation between English and American interpretations of the political heritage of Magna Carta. We will then examine the role that Magna Carta currently plays as a symbol of kinship between the American and British peoples.

HIST 430: Commerce, Culture, and Catholicism

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 492: Directed Readings

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 494: Research Apprenticeship

3.00 Credits

This course, available by application to Dr. Young only, offers undergraduate students the opportunity to work as a research assistant for faculty.

HIST 495: Internship

3.00 Credits

Students who plan to do an internship in a future semester can apply to Dr. Young to see if the internship might be eligible for course credit.

HIST 496: Senior Thesis Seminar

3.00 Credits

Required for senior concentrators. The culminating requirement for every student seeking a B.A. degree in history is an undergraduate thesis, based on primary research in original sources. For concentrators in history, this thesis requirement substitutes for the comprehensive examination required for most other undergraduate subjects. Each fall semester, the several sections of HIST 401 are offered in different areas of history (Medieval Europe, Early United States, etc.); groups of students work on their individual projects but present each stage of their research to their fellow students in the tutorial group. Entry to tutorial sections is arranged during the previous semester (during HIST 388). Prerequisites: 101, 102, 387, and 388.

HIST 517: Researching Media History: Discovering Cultural History at the Library of Congress

3.00 Credits

"Students focus on learning historical research methods, utilizing primary documents, sound materials, and digital humanities tools at the Library of Congress, toward the development of an original publication-length paper on broadcasting, film, or communications policy history. With the aid of the instructor and designated archival staff members, students craft proposals and writing samples useful for applications to film and media, communications, or cultural history graduate programs, as well as think tanks, research agencies, and content development fields."

HIST 531: Renaissance

3.00 Credits

An examination of current scholarship on such topics as civic humanism (Florence and Venice), Florentine Platonism, humanistic theology, art, epideictic oratory, Roman Renaissance, conciliarism, education, Erasmian humanism, Italian confraternities, the family, the roles of women, and northern humanism.

HIST 531A: Renaissance Papacy

3.00 Credits

Renaissance Papacy (1327-1527): From the beginnings of the Renaissance in the Avignon of Petrarch and John XXII to the Sack of Rome under the Medici pope Clement VII, the papacy has fostered the revival of classical learning by its patronage of writers and artists. It employed them as secretaries and advisors, and hired the leading architects, sculptors, and painter of the day to change Rome from a backward medieval town into the cultural capital of Western Christendom. Especially noteworthy for their patronage were popes Nicholas V, Pius II, Julius II, and Leo X. The course will study how the popes fostered Renaissance culture while facing the various challenges: conciliarism and an assertive college of cardinals, gaining control of and protecting the Papal States, dealing with the rising national monarchies, stemming the advancing Turks, fostering the missionary expansion of Christendom, reforming the Church, and confronting the outbreak of the Protestant Reformation.

HIST 532: Atheism, Sketicism and Secularism from the Renaissance On

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 540: Famine Irish Immigrants and their Children: A Case Study in Immigration

3.00 Credits

This course will focus on the story of the Irish immigrants who fled their homeland's famine in the late 1840s and their children, who grew to maturity at the turn of the twentieth century, as a case study in American immigration and ethnic group history. Participants will read from all the major secondary sources on topics such as family history and family memory; the background of Famine Irish society; the Famine and its aftermath in Ireland, the processes of migration; the theory of ethnic group evolution in America; Irish participation in the American economy; Irish American neighborhoods; Irish American families; the civic, religious and leisure lives of Famine immigrants and their children; and Irish Americans and other immigrant groups. Participants will also learn how to use primary sources in Ireland and the United States to reconstruct histories of Irish and Irish American families and communities in the nineteenth century.

HIST 549: Humanism to Enlightenment

3.00 Credits

This is an introductory survey of early modern intellectual history. We will focus on defining Humanism and weighing its influence (or lack thereof) on the Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. How did each of these successive movements break away from Humanism, and why did Humanism remain a vital educational and cultural force despite these shifts? For each week we will read one major monograph and one primary source. Advanced undergraduates are welcome to enroll.

HIST 550: Reformation

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 560: Civil War & Reconstruction

3.00 Credits

This colloquium explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. We will examine topics including: the politics of pro- and anti-slavery and the sectional crisis of the 1850s; military events and political affairs during the war; the experiences of Americans on the battlefield and the home front; the destruction of slavery; and the post-war reconstruction of the South and the nation.

HIST 574: The Missionary Church in America, Asia and Africa, 1500-1800

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 577: Wars of Religion: Montaigne's Essays

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 592: Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 593: Directed Research

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 601: Historical Analysis and Methodology

3.00 Credits

This course introduces graduate students to perennial issues and contemporary trends in the academic study of history. It examines the issues of bias and objectivity, the relationship of ideology to social science, and the fructification of historical writing by borrowing from other social sciences. It explores the relationship of theory, generalization, and historical practice. It examines the use of quantitative and qualitative historical evidence. The course aims to make its participants more analytically acute readers and writers of historical works.

HIST 603: Historical Teaching

3.00 Credits

A practicum for teaching history at the undergraduate level, intended for and limited to graduate students serving as teaching assistants in the department.

HIST 607: Women, Sex, and Gender in the Middle Ages, 1100-1500

3.00 Credits

This colloquium aims to introduce the literature of the inter-related topics of women, sex, and gender in the later medieval period. We will examine some classic topics, theory, and historiography of women's history in addition to the recent scholarship in the developing fields of the history of gender and sexuality. Topics can include: women and work; women and religion; women and patronage, gender and religion; gender and identity; gender and household; heresy and gender; and sexual identities. All readings are in English.

HIST 609: Medieval Civilization I: Historiographical Problems

3.00 Credits

This course will serve to introduce students to some of the major themes and problems which currently define the field of early medieval history, circa 500-1200. We will read some classic works of history on the early Middle Ages, as well as new and innovative approaches. Topics will include archaeology, the 'Feudal Revolution', and ritual, among others. The class will be structured around some of the major debates which dominate the study of early medieval history.

HIST 610: Medieval Civilization II: Historiographical Problems

3.00 Credits

This course is neither lecture nor survey; rather, it is designed as an introduction to some of the major historiographical themes and problems of the later medieval period. We shall examine historians' methods and approaches to these topics by way of a mixture of classic monographs interspersed with some of the newest and most stimulating contributions to the field of medieval history. Geographically speaking, topics range throughout the territory of Western Europe. Chronologically, we will move from the twelfth through early fifteenth centuries. Topics can include: economy, family, religious cultures, polities, public life, administration, violence, plague and literacy.

HIST 611A: Problems in Carolingian History

3.00 Credits

The Carolingian period saw the unification of the majority of Western Europe under one polity and concomitant changes in western politics, religion, and culture, ranging from the development of Caroline miniscule handwriting, to the formation of an alliance between the Frankish monarchy and the papacy, to a rediscovery of Roman ivory-working techniques. The course will introduce students to this transitional period of western history by exploring topics currently debated by scholars, such as the nature of changes in rulership or the contexts for economic growth. Students will be exposed to both classics in the field and to some new approaches. Readings will be in English, although those able to read in French or German will be encouraged to do so.

HIST 612A: Archaeology for the Medieval Historian

3.00 Credits

Medieval archaeology, and in particular early medieval archaeology, is currently transforming our knowledge of the Middle Ages. New discoveries, new scientific techniques to interpret sites and new collaborations between historians and archaeologists are expanding our vision of the Middle Ages every day. This course seeks to prepare graduate students to understand and participate in this new research. We will read together several field reports, as well as studies by historians and archaeologists who seek to synthesize the new information revealed by recent excavations. Students will be introduced to the language and techniques of medieval archaeology, and will learn how to critique a field report, and how to integrate archaeological materials into historical research.

HIST 613: The Reformation

3.00 Credits

Examines current scholarship on such topics as the state of religion on the eve of the Reformation, Luther, the Peasants' War, diffusion of Reformation ideas (printing, sermons, art, etc.), Reformation in the German cities, origins of Anabaptism, Evangelism in Italy, the role of civil government in the English Reformation, women, Jews, witch-craze, and the effects of the Reformation.

HIST 613A: Catholic Reformation (1302-1540)

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 613B: Colloquium: Council of Trent

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 614: The Renaissance

3.00 Credits

An examination of current scholarship on such topics as civic humanism (Florence and Venice), Florentine Platonism, humanistic theology, art, epideictic oratory, Roman Renaissance, conciliarism, education, Erasmian humanism, Italian confraternities, the family, the roles of women, and northern humanism.

HIST 614A: Counter-Reformation

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 617B: Boethius, Then and Later

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 619: Readings on the Old South

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 621A: Classics of Medieval History

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 622: Topics in Medieval History

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 622A: The Early Medieval Economy

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 623B: The History of the Book

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 623C: History of Libraries

3.00 Credits

This course examines the birth, development and transformation of libraries from antiquity until the present day. Beginning with the role and function of libraries in ancient world Greece, Rome, and Alexandria the course also studies in detail the monastic, cathedral and university libraries of the Middle Ages. Aiming at a global perspective, the course looks also at the libraries of the Islamic world and the far east, particularly China, Japan and India, adding a comparative dimension to the discussion. The rise of humanistic libraries such as the Bibliotheca Vaticana Apostolica, the Bodleian Library, and Bibliothèque Nationale will receive special attention. Other topics include subscription libraries, originally a British institution which found great success in the United States; the birth of national libraries with a focus on the Library of Congress; the formation of public libraries and library architecture. The course will treat the various types and functions of present-day libraries (from public lending and academic libraries to community and circulating libraries), their function, organization, services and patrons. The course concludes with the shift to digital libraries and reflections on the future of libraries.

HIST 627A: Readings in Modern European History

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 628: U.S. Diplomatic History

3.00 Credits

This course will provide students with an introduction to U.S. diplomatic history. It will include classic works of scholarship, memoirs and recent monographs. It will range from the American Revolution to the post-Cold War period, and it place the evolution of American diplomacy in a global historical - and historiographical - context.

HIST 629: Topics in Cold War History

3.00 Credits

A readings course examining the domestic politics, diplomacy, and global impact of the Cold War.

HIST 629B: Bestsellers of Early Modern Europe

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 629C: The American Century and its Critics: Lionel Trilling and Robert Penn Warren

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 630A: The Vietnam War in History and Literature

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 631: State & Society: Early Modern Europe

3.00 Credits

Statemaking and its social and cultural implications from 1450-1800. Issues examined include the military revolution, fiscal history, the rise of the court, revolt and revolution, and shifting political culture.

HIST 631A: Church, State, and Law in Early Modern Europe

3.00 Credits

Topics covered will include the relationship between church, state, and law in the Renaissance and Reformation, the Spanish Inquisition, overseas expansion, early modern Rome and the papacy, the wars of religion, absolutism and constitutionalism, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. Particular attention will be given to definitions of natural law, the question of nationalism, the rise of the nation state and the growth of state power, religious toleration, codification, diplomacy, and sovereignty.

HIST 632: Tudor British History

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the variety of topics and of approaches evident in recent historical research and writing concerning England during the Tudor and early Stuart periods (roughly 1500-1650). The course consists of topically-based units of reading, illustrating different typologies of work exemplified in the current secondary literature at large. Roughly equal emphasis upon political, social and economic, and religious history. Major topics include the problems of the medieval/early modern divide, the English reformation(s), the foundations of the early modern state, and economic and demographic change. In-class discussions and writing assignments focus upon approaches and historiography.

HIST 633A: The Creation of the Middle Ages by the Early Modern World

3.00 Credits

The Renaissance self-consciously tried to distinguish itself from the 'dark ages' that had preceded it, introducing a new and influential understanding of the European past. But the early modern period could not easily divorce itself from the Middle Ages, even as it often disparaged medieval 'barbarism.' This course will consider the rise of medieval scholarship from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment and the powerful influence of medieval intellectuals on many aspects of early modern European life. Topics will include the contest between humanism and scholasticism, the circulation of medieval works, the survival of the manuscript in the age of the printing press, transitions in art and architecture, diverging interpretations of Church history, and the practice of history.

HIST 635: European Culture and Society, 1450-1800

3.00 Credits

This course will survey a range of themes and topics relating to the cultural evolution of Europe in the early modern period. The approach of the course is to look at the experiences, customs, and beliefs of Europeans of all classes and to place them within the context of the cultural development of society. This course will examine a series of "cultures," including print culture, learned culture, popular culture, religious culture, political culture, and consumer culture and the rise of the market culture.

HIST 635A: Reform & Society in the long sixteenth century

3.00 Credits

Assigned readings touch on four general themes: reform among the laity; Luther and the politics of reformation'urban and territorial; Calvinism and the Reformed tradition; and French humanism in an era of religious war. The common readings will combine a few primary sources (from the Devotio moderna, Luther, Calvin, and Montaigne) with 'classics' of Reformation historiography in these four areas (likely examples include Steven Ozment, The Reformation in the Cities; Natalie Zemon Davis, Society and Culture in Early Modern France; Bernd Moeller, Imperial Cities and the Reformation; William J. Bouwsma, John Calvin). Students will write four short essays on assigned readings. A longer exercise on a negotiated topic suggested by the assigned reading, but adding more recent titles, will include a preliminary oral presentation on that topic, and an essay due at the end of the term.

HIST 636A: Comparative Theories of Empire

3.00 Credits

This course examines the nature of modern imperialism through a variety of methodological and comparative historical perspectives. These include, but are not limited to, the Ottoman, Russian, British, Japanese, and American empires.

HIST 637: Politics & Society :20th Century United States

3.00 Credits

Exploration of a tumultuous period of depression and world war; focuses on such issues as the causes of economic depression and recovery, the nature of the New Deal, the rise of organized labor, the character and influence of mass culture, the relationship of art and politics, and domestic effects of war mobilization, and continuities and changes in the lives of ordinary Americans. Special efforts to integrate the perspectives offered by political, cultural, and social history.

HIST 638A: History and Literature

3.00 Credits

This seminar will explore the historical dimension to several works of American literature, focusing on the ways in which writers of fiction try to capture the feel of the past, to seek the genesis of the present in the past and to explore the workings of memory (often in relation to a traumatic event in the past). It will begin with a discussion of Erich Auerbach's theoretical text, Mimesis. It will move on to Tolstoy's War and Peace, after which it will stay on American soil with: Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Fauklner's Absalom, Absalom! Cather's My Antonia, Ellison's Invisible Man, Mailer's Armies of the Night, Krauss' The History of Love and Roth's American Pastoral. Of obvious interest to students of literature, this course should be no less relevant to students of history. With both types of student in mind, it will concentrate on matters of narrative, portraiture and historical argumentation as well on the historical research each of the writers in question did while devising their fictional creations.

HIST 639A: Mapping History

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 640: Later Medieval England

3.00 Credits

Intended to give students an introduction to the variety of topics and of approaches in historical research and writing concerning later-medieval England (basically, the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries). The reading list has been put together, first, to construct topically-based units of reading, drawn from a variety of areas (political, religious, social, economic, etc.); and second, to illustrate different typologies of work exemplified in the current secondary literature at large. Emphasis in discussion not only upon substantive topics, but also upon historiography. Each student chooses one larger topic or problem arising out of the reading list for a more extended historiographical essay.

HIST 640A: Readings Med. England

3.00 Credits

This course provides an introduction to recent scholarship on medieval England, focusing on the period between about 1000 and 1500. We will examine the most important thematic areas and scholarly controversies in the field. In the political sphere, we will look at the impact of the Norman Conquest, the relationship between England and its neighbors within the British Isles, the development of the English legal system, and the rise of Parliament. We will also examine religious life (both within the institutional church and more broadly among the laity), economic change, aristocratic culture, gender relations, and urbanization.

HIST 641: Europe's Core: East Central Europe since 1700

3.00 Credits

An introduction to major themes and methods in the study of modern European intellectual history. Emphasis on contextual approaches, on the history of social and political thought, and on the social and political roles of intellectuals. First semester covers the period from the mid-seventeenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries; explorations of works by Hobbes, Locke, Voltaire, Hume, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Edmund Burke, the Romantics, Hegel, Marx, Mill, and others. Second semester covers the period from the late nineteenth century to the present, beginning with the critique of liberalism and rationalism in the works of Nietzsche, Pareto, and Freud; examines Durkheim, Weber, and the rise of sociology; the intellectual reaction to the First World War, to communism, and to fascism; and the reformulation of liberal, conservative, and radical thought in the later twentieth century. Previously offered as 626 and 641.

HIST 641A: Modern Eastern Europe: Key Topics in the History of Eastern Europe

3.00 Credits

An introduction into new research and recent historiographic debates on the history of the European areas between Germany and Russia. What do we now know about nationalism in East and Eastern Central Europe? Why are the nation states of the region so homogeneous while the former empires (German, Habsburg, Romanov, Ottoman) were so mixed? Which role did political concepts and ideologies (nationalism, liberalism, socialism, communism) play in the region? The course will also discuss the history of religion and gender and the complexities of modernity in Eastern Europe.

HIST 641B: Social and Political History of European Catholicism

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 641C: Globalization of Catholicism since 1900

3.00 Credits

This course deals with the history of Roman Catholicism in the twentieth century, and its transformation from a primarily European to a global faith. Topics include the complex relationship between Catholicism and liberal modernity, capitalism, and democracy in Europe and beyond; the Second Vatican Council; liberation theology; the effects of the downfall of Communism in Eastern Europe; and the impact of the shift of Catholicism to South America, Asia, and Africa. The course will focus on the main developments of the changes of the relationship between Catholicism and the modern world since the 19th century. It will investigate how the globalization of the Catholic community affected European Catholicism and how the church began to adapt to these changes, most visibly during the II Vatican Council (1962-65). The course will also deal with the relationship between Catholicism and revolutionary movements in Europe, South America, and Asia by looking at the impacts Liberation Theology had in the last third of the 20th Century and how the downfall of communism influenced Catholicism in the same period.

HIST 642: Modern European Intellectual History II

3.00 Credits

An introduction to major themes and methods in the study of modern European intellectual history. Emphasis on contextual approaches, on the history of social and political thought, and on the social and political roles of intellectuals. First semester covers the period from the mid-seventeenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries; explorations of works by Hobbes, Locke, Voltaire, Hume, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Edmund Burke, the Romantics, Hegel, Marx, Mill, and others. Second semester covers the period from the late nineteenth century to the present, beginning with the critique of liberalism and rationalism in the works of Nietzsche, Pareto, and Freud; examines Durkheim, Weber, and the rise of sociology; the intellectual reaction to the First World War, to communism, and to fascism; and the reformulation of liberal, conservative, and radical thought in the later twentieth century. Previously offered as 626 and 641.

HIST 642B: Interreligious Encounters in the Medieval Mediterranean

3.00 Credits

This course surveys major themes in the ongoing encounter between the religious groups of the Mediterranean world from the coming of Islam to the rise of the Ottomans. Focusing chiefly on Muslims, Christians, and Jews from Spain to Iran, the course revolves around a series of major historiographical questions related to the dynamics of social interaction and intellectual exchange between different religious communities. Topics of focus include martyrdom, conversion, Christian and Jewish responses to the coming of Islam, the construction of heresy, and the reception of Islamic learning in the Latin West, among others. Course readings include a mix of historiography and primary sources in translation.

HIST 643: Medieval Monasticism

3.00 Credits

Designed as an introduction to the bibliography of and original research in published and unpublished records of medieval monasticism (fifth to twelfth centuries). Participants investigate sources involving several important aspects of this field of medieval history: intellectual, religious, political, economic, and social. Students required to participate in weekly discussions, to contribute oral presentations, and to write one research paper of 15-20 typewritten pages.

HIST 644: Topics in Modern Britain

3.00 Credits

This course provides an overview of major topics and methods of the historiography of Britain since 1750. Emphasis will be upon cultural, social, and political approaches to the study of history.

HIST 645: Power, Patronage and Propaganda in the Early Modern World

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 647: Religious Interpretation and Cultural Criticism in Modern Europe

3.00 Credits

This course examines the links between biblical criticism, challenging interpretations of Christianity, and political and cultural criticism. We examine why leading political analysts and cultural critics felt compelled to offer interpretations of the Bible and its significance, and why religious thinkers offered new interpretations of the meaning of Christianity (and its links to or distance from Judaism) in light of changing historical understandings. The focus is on the nineteenth century, but to put it in historical context, we will first look at how these issues were addressed by major thinkers from Hobbes through Kant. We then focus on comparing the analyses of Christianity and its relationship to modern culture in the work of John Henry Newman, Matthew Arnold and Friedrich Nietzsche.

HIST 650A: New Deal and World War II

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 651A: Readings in American History

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 651B: The United States in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 653A: From Shakespeare to Sheridan: The Irish in the Theatre, 1600-1775

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 656: Readings in Colonial North America.

3.00 Credits

This course surveys the most important scholarship in the colonial era of North American history. Students will critically evaluate new works, enduring works, and the historiographical frameworks that have shaped the field. Our approaches will include the colonial and imperial schools, the new continental history, and the many faces of Atlantic history. Topics include: religion and society, migration, women and gender, slavery and freedom, military history, economics, and politics.

HIST 660: Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction

3.00 Credits

This colloquium explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. We will examine topics including: the politics of pro- and anti-slavery and the sectional crisis of the 1850s; military events and political affairs during the war; the experiences of Americans on the battlefield and the home front; the destruction of slavery; and the post-war reconstruction of the South and the nation.

HIST 661: Readings in American Religious History

3.00 Credits

Reading, analysis and discussion of important recent books and articles on various aspects of American religious history, including material from every chronological period of the American past. Also includes a variety of religious traditions: readings cover several variants of Protestantism, as well as Roman Catholicism, Judaism and Islam. Students who wish to read more widely will be able to do so.

HIST 661A: Catholics, Europe & US

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 663: Immigration and Ethnicity in America, 1840-1970

3.00 Credits

Focuses on immigrants who came to America in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and their American-born children and grandchildren. Concentrates mostly on immigrants from Europe and their descendants, but includes discussions of Latino Americans and Asian Americans. Readings address such issues as immigrant life in the old world, causes and processes of immigration, adjustments made in the new world, family life and gender roles, group identities and boundaries, religious beliefs and practices, and participation in labor movements and politics.

HIST 663A: Migration, Ethnicity & Diaspora

3.00 Credits

Investigates the role of religion and diaspora among migrants in the Americas between 1870 and 1940. Using historical case studies of migrant groups (Irish, Mexicans, Eastern European Jews, Armenians, and Japanese), students will examine how religious belief and religious identity created and informed diasporic migrant communities. In doing so, we will test theories of ethnic assimilation, develop working definitions of 'diaspora' and 'ethnicity,' and analyze the enduring impact of religious belief on the migrant experience.

HIST 670: Slavery in America & the Atlantic World to 1865

3.00 Credits

This course examines America's place in the Atlantic World (c. 1450-1877) through the institution of racial slavery and the lived experiences of forced migrants in the African Diaspora. While the geographic focus is North America and the Caribbean, we also give serious attention to Latin America and Africa. Our emphasis is on exploring the most important and innovative scholarship in these dynamic transnational fields while also engaging longstanding scholarly debates and frameworks. Subjects include: African kingdoms, the slave trade, intercultural encounters, cultural change during migration, religious experience, ethnicity/ethnogenesis, ideas of race and gender, everyday life and the family, the economics of slavery and labor, the politics of slavery, free blacks and their activism, abolition and emancipation movements (and religion's role), and the effects of slavery on American society.

HIST 670A: Slavery and Freedom in 19th Century America

3.00 Credits

This course explores the development and destruction of slavery in the United States from the early republic through the late nineteenth century. Topics include: slavery in the age of revolutions; the "first emancipation" and the growth of anti-slavery movements; the territorial expansion of slavery and the creation of the cotton kingdom; the intertwined lives of masters and slaves; political economy and pro-slavery ideology; transnational perspectives on slavery and abolition; and post-emancipation struggles over the meaning and extent of freedom.

HIST 673: The Irish in America

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 674: Old Regime France and the French Revolution

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the structure of the old regime and the attempt by the French Revolution to remake society and government. The interaction between culture and politics will be highlighted throughout the course, which will focus on public opinion, secularism, religion, and the creation of conservative resistance. Particular attention will be paid to the historiographical debates over the causes and consequences of the French Revolution.

HIST 675: Revolutionary America and the Early Republic

3.00 Credits

This course surveys some of the most important scholarship in the history of Revolutionary America. Students will critically evaluate new works and classics, and understand them in relation to the subject's rich historiographical traditions. Topics include: political though, popular mobilization, military history, religion and society, women and gender, nationalism, American culture, liberty and slavery, race and economics.

HIST 678A: Gender and the Family in the Islamic World

3.00 Credits

This course surveys the development of family structures and conceptions of gender in the eastern Mediterranean and Middle East from antiquity to the early modern period. We will examine the modes of family organization and ways of thinking about the relationship between the sexes characteristic of the medieval eastern Mediterranean, as well as how those facets changed from late antiquity to medieval Islam. Our second major goal will be to consider a range of methodologies, from social anthropology to gender studies, that have informed historians' attempts to understand the family in the historical settings of the eastern Mediterranean. The course welcomes both specialists in Middle Eastern history and historians of other regions. Though topics related to the medieval Islamic world compose the bulk of our studies, we will also venture into the ancient Middle East, the Christian Roman Empire, and comparative material from the medieval Latin West. Perspectives and insights from other historiographical areas that aid us in the study of the eastern Mediterranean are encouraged and welcome.

HIST 679: Latin Hagiography of the Later Middle Ages

3.00 Credits

This colloquium aims to introduce participants to the genre of hagiography (writings on the saints) and the modern discipline of hagiography, the study of sanctity in all its multi-faceted manifestations. Thus the course examines medieval writings about saints and sanctity along with the recent body of literature that employs hagiography as a source for understanding medieval society. Moving from the Bollandists and the emergence of hagiography as a scholarly discipline, the course looks at a wide variety of methodological approaches to the study of sanctity through topics such as vitae, canonization, pilgrimage, relics, miracles, gender, and local religion.

HIST 680A: Readings on Later Medieval Italy

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the recent scholarship on later medieval Italy, focusing on the twelfth through fourteenth centuries. Through the lenses of politics, religion, society, law, and economy, along with a variety of approaches, we will examine both Italy's distinctiveness and continuity in relation to Northern European institutions. Topics include communal politics, civic religion, women and family, the commercial revolution, violence and vendetta, literacy and patronage.

HIST 681A: The Family in Early Modern Europe

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 682A: American & European Conservatism

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 682B: History of Capitalism in Europe and US

3.00 Credits

This course provides an introduction for graduate students to the ways in which historians have approached the history of capitalism. Its focus is on Europe and North America from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. Topics include the rise of the fiscal state; the consumer revolution of the eighteenth century; the origins and nature of the industrial revolution; the relationship of New World slavery to the international capitalist economy; and changing structures of enterprise, labor, distribution and consumption. Readings are drawn from a variety of historiographies: economic history, political history, business history, labor history, environmental history, social and cultural history, and intellectual history.

HIST 682C: Liberalism & Conservatism

3.00 Credits

This course explores the development of liberal and conservative thought in Europe and the United States from the eighteenth through the late twentieth centuries. It focuses on great public policy debates between liberals and conservatives on issues of liberty, security, marriage, and the legitimacy of various sorts of inequality; and examines issues related to government, the family, and the economy. Readings are from both primary sources and secondary literature.

HIST 684A: The Iberian World, 1500-1800

3.00 Credits

An analysis of central themes in the political, cultural, and religious history of Spain, Portugal, and their empires. Topics include the political and economic history of late-medieval Iberia; the Catholic church in the Iberian world; the establishment of the Inquisition and the expulsion of the Jews from Spain; the conquest and settlement of the Spanish and Portuguese empires in America and in Asia; slavery and the slave trade; the relationship between European, Indian and African cultures in America; and the comparative history of Brazil and Spanish America.

HIST 685A: Church in Latin America

3.00 Credits

Focuses on the history of the Catholic Church in Latin America, from 1492 to the present. Readings will cover a variety of topics, including the Spanish missions, indigenous adoption and adaptation of Christianity, the Virgin of Guadalupe, syncretic African Catholicism in Brazil and Cuba, church/state conflicts after Independence, and Catholicism in twentieth-century Latin America. Although most readings focus on Latin America proper, the course will also cover Latin American migrants in the United States. As a result, the readings and discussions will give students a historical foundation for understanding Latin American and Latino Catholicism, Hispanic and Latino ministry, and the culture and traditions that produced notable Latin American Catholic leaders, particularly Pope Francis I.

HIST 686: Modern Mexico

3.00 Credits

Readings course examining economic, social, and political development of Mexico, 1810-1940.

HIST 691A: Portugal and Brazil,1415-1806

3.00 Credits

The course explores central themes in the history of Portugal and Brazil from the foundation of the Portuguese empire to Brazilian independence. Topics will include Portuguese social and political history under the Aviz, Habsburg, and Braganca dynasties; European perceptions of Brazil during the colonial period; the missionary church and its relations with Portuguese settlers, Indians and Africans in Brazil; the Portuguese Inquisition; the bandeirantes and the exploration of the Brazilian interior; the history of slavery in the Luso-Brazilian empire; and the comparative history of colonial Brazil and Spanish America.

HIST 694: Medieval Islam and Eastern Christianity

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 694A: Readings in Medieval Islamic History

3.00 Credits

Based on readings in contemporary historiography, this course seeks to set the emergence of Islam within the context of Late Antique religious change and sketch the development of Islamic religion and government up to the tenth century.

HIST 694B: Historiography of Medieval Islam

3.00 Credits

This course introduces graduate students to the major problems, scholarly debates, and methodological approaches to the study of the history of the pre-Ottoman Islamic Middle East. General areas covered include the historical origins and development of Islam and Islamic intellectual disciplines, the Islamic Middle East in its Late Antique and Mediterranean contexts, and basic theoretical orientations to the study of both non-western and pre-modern societies. The course welcomes both specialists in Middle Eastern history and historians of other regions. As such, the themes studied throughout the course strike a balance between those focused on 'internal' aspects of Islamic history and those that branch into other areas of world history, particularly connections between the Islamic Middle East, Byzantium, and the Latin West. Perspectives and insights from other historiographical areas that aid us in the study of Middle Eastern history are encouraged and welcome."

HIST 696: Master's Thesis Research

0 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

HIST 698A: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

HIST 698B: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

HIST 712: Early Modern European Historiography

3.00 Credits

This course serves as an introduction to the historiography of early modern Europe, from the Renaissance to the French Revolution. Its readings and assignments prepare the student for his or her comprehensive exams in the field.

HIST 793: Directed Research

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 798: Student/Faculty Research

1.00 Credits

Directed Research on a specific topic defined by an instructor.

HIST 804: 'Late Antiquity' East and West

3.00 Credits

The notion that there is a distinct historical period, 'Late Antiquity,' has become immensely popular in the past fifty years; and yet the notion has also been challenged by scholars in the field. Both enthusiasm and misgiving have been focused on both the 'post-Roman' West and the early 'Byzantine' empire (together with the new Islamic polity that grew up alongside it). After surveying the development of the concept, the course will examine recent debates and analyze the issues at stake'which include the supposed differences between western settler kingdoms and the apparently enduring 'Roman' empire centered in Constantinople, disciplinary boundaries (which often reinforce positions adopted in the controversy), and the claims made for 'transformation' over 'fall' or 'decline' in relation to ancient culture.

HIST 805: Sources of Medieval England

3.00 Credits

This research seminar is designed to introduce students to the narrative sources for medieval England between the late Anglo-Saxon period and the Wars of the Roses, including annals, chronicles, and hagiographic sources. We will look at the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and associated sources, the great Anglo-Norman historians of the eleventh and twelfth centuries, and the burgeoning number of chronicles in the later Middle Ages that were addressed to a secular audience. In addition to reading primary sources, we will be exploring some of the secondary literature on medieval English narrative.

HIST 808A: The Carolingian Empire

3.00 Credits

This seminar will explore key themes in the development of the Carolingian Empire, including the cultural expansion known as the Carolingian Renaissance, the political innovations of the Carolingian rulers, and the contribution of archaeology to our understanding of the economic basis of the Carolingian world. The course will also serve to introduce students to the main source collections and research tools used by early medieval historians. Students will undertake a research project of their own devising related to the themes of the course and drawing on the source collections and tools introduced during the course. A reading knowledge of Latin is required.

HIST 809A: Dispute Settlement in the Early Medieval World

3.00 Credits

Dispute settlement, or more broadly conflict resolution, is currently one of the most vibrant fields of study in medieval history. The course will explores cultures of disputing and resolving conflict in the early Middle Ages. Classes will focus on close reading of dispute settlement records in the original Latin, contexualizing them in their historical, social, and political settings. Each student will undertake a research project of their own design on a group of dispute records from the Middle Ages. The class will also read the major historiographical and anthropological works on disputing which have shaped the field. Reading knowledge of Latin is required.

HIST 809B: Strategies of Conversion in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 810: Seminar: Later Medieval History

3.00 Credits

Topic examples: the Church in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries; the Gregorian reform movement; investiture controversy; Pope Innocent III; the spread of Heresy; the evolution of canon law; the twelfth century in the Latin West; councils and reforms, 843-1123; Carolingian society and culture.

HIST 817: Council of Trent

3.00 Credits

Seminar on the background, debates, decrees, and implementation of the Council of Trent (1545-63).

HIST 820: Colonies and Empires

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 821: Post war American Conservatism

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 822: Seminar: Medieval Italy

3.00 Credits

This research seminar aims to introduce participants to the sources for the study of medieval Italy. Sources include narrative sources such as chronicles, letter collections, hagiography and sermons; diplomatic evidence such as notarial documents and cartularies; as well as statute laws and governmental records.

HIST 823A: History Writing in the Early Middle Ages

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 824A: Christian Asceticism at the Dawn of the Middle Ages

3.00 Credits

There is still a common assumption that, by the end of the sixth century, ascetic (perhaps even 'monastic') practices and institutions were poised to develop without challenge or adaptation for several hundred years. The course will explore the basis of the assumption and then deconstruct it, at least to the extent of questioning whether a single 'monastic tradition' was already in place around 600 CE and destined to survive intact. The phrase 'the Middle Ages' hints at a western, Latin emphasis, since the notion of the 'medieval' is essentially a later western invention, reflecting attitudes increasingly prevalent after 1350 CE or so, deeply influenced by what we now think of as the 'Renaissance' and 'Reformation.' Students will have the opportunity, however, to examine features of early ascetic culture characteristic of Greek, Coptic, and Syriac milieux. The course is offered for students not only in the "Early Christian Studies" program or the Department of History but also in theological, philosophical, classical, and Semitic sectors. It is also open to undergraduate seniors with a grade average of A or A- in their junior year, subject to the approval of the relevant Chair or Area Director, the Director of the "Early Christian studies" program, and the Instructor.

HIST 824B: Ascetics and Healing Late Antiquity

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 827: Seminar: US Intellectual History

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 832: Seminar: Renaissance and Reformation

3.00 Credits

Among topics considered: conciliarism, the papacy, Erasmus and his critics, Reformation in Italy, colloquies between Protestants and Catholics, Trent.

HIST 833: Seminar: Issues in Renaissance Religion

3.00 Credits

Research into religious experience and its expressions in Western Europe during the Renaissance period c. 1320-1520--whether clerical or lay, group or individual, orthodox or heretical.

HIST 833A: Renaissance Papacy

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 839: Seminar: Early Modern European Society

3.00 Credits

Focuses on a different topic each year it is offered. All topics considered in comparative perspective, within the context of Western Europe between the late Middle Ages and the French Revolution. Interdisciplinary approach informs the course material. Topics considered include comparative aristocracies, revolts, rebellions and revolutions; political culture in an early modern perspective; and state making.

HIST 841: Great Works of Modern Social Thought

3.00 Credits

This course examines the great works of modern social science, form Hobbes, Leviathan through Freud's Interpretation of Dreams, works of ongoing interest and influence that have achieved the status of classics. Each work is studied in its historical context, with an eye to bringing out the themes of perennial interest for the study of history, society, politics, economics, psychology and culture. Students produce a research paper on one or more of the selected thinkers.

HIST 842: Seminar: Capitalism In Modern European Thought

3.00 Credits

Explores the ways in which European intellectuals, political movements, and churches from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries have conceived of the moral, cultural, and political effects of the market.

HIST 844: Political History of the Middle Ages

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 846: Seminar: Politics and Culture in Modern Britain

3.00 Credits

Designed to introduce students to current issues in modern British political and cultural history. Focuses on political languages and expression, and on the formation of political ideologies and communities of opinion. Students participate in ongoing discussions of common texts and complete a research project based on substantive primary research.

HIST 851: Seminar: North Atlantic World

3.00 Credits

The emergence of an Atlantic world in the early modern period connected Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans in new dynamics of trade, warfare, migration, labor, and cultural exchange. Common readings will focus on a variety of contemporary sources and are designed to facilitate a wide range of research projects. Alongside the imaginative literature by which Europeans sought to make sense of this emerging Atlantic world, we will explore state papers about colonial policy; travel narratives about Ireland, the Levant, and Africa as well as North America; and documents that illuminate the changing visions and experiences of native peoples, immigrant Africans, and colonial settlers.

HIST 854: Research Seminar: Immigration and Ethnicity

3.00 Credits

This will be a research seminar in American racial, ethnic and religion in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students may address a wide range of potential subjects, but projects focusing on group relations and evolutions of group identities and cultures will be especially encouraged.

HIST 857: Seminar: Citizenship and Identity in North America

3.00 Credits

Designed to accommodate a variety of research topics concerning the relationship between individual senses of self, constructed communities, and the body politic in a period which many historians identify as crucial to the emergence of modern notions of nationalism, class, gender, race, religion, community, and sexuality. Common readings highlight current debates and model methods of analysis.

HIST 860A: Seminar: 19th Century US

3.00 Credits

no description available

HIST 861: Seminar: Civil War and Reconstruction

3.00 Credits

Covers the years from 1845 to 1877; especially concerned with the relationship between the military world of the North and South and the social consequences of military actions for the people and the economy. The politics and political culture of warfare are also stressed.

HIST 870: Seminar: Modern American History

3.00 Credits

Offers students an opportunity to research a variety of topics pertaining to politics, culture, and society in the twentieth-century United States. Possible research subjects include the changing nature of liberalism, radicalism, and conservatism; the rise and fall of the labor movement; the emergence of a strong national state; the character of American nationalism and patriotism; the social experience of class, ethnicity, race, and gender.

HIST 879: Seminar: War and Society: America, 1880-1945

3.00 Credits

Explores the relationship between American industrial, commercial, diplomatic, naval, and military developments during a sixty-year period prior to World War II. Treats such issues as the rise of the United States to the status of a world power by the end of the Spanish-American war and its subsequent involvement in issues which led to World Wars I and II. American society and its approach to the problems of world leadership gradually were transformed by a series of events during periods of peace and war.

HIST 996: Doctoral Dissertation Research

0 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

HIST 998A: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

HIST 998B: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.